Posts Tagged 'communication'

The Power of Your Story

This morning I heard a presentation from John Stevenson, owner of Client Kudos, a business that tells client stories. John reminded me of how powerful story telling can be for businesses. I’m a writer by trade who has spent the last 10 years in the online world. John brought me back to the value of the printed word.

“Meaning + Memory = Stickiness,” he said during his presentation. Sharing the relevancy of your product and services in a memorable way increases engagement – my words. I admire John’s campaign to eliminate the corporate brochure. I’ve written hundreds of corporate brochures and have tried to incorporate the elements of story into the copy.

The building blocks of a story are anecdotes or a sequence of events and actions that end in a moment of reflection or what does this mean to the reader. Elements that move the reader include challenges, journeys, finds and what it all means. In other words, why should I care about your story?

Last night I read a blog post by Scott Stratten of @unmarketing (Twitter) about Facebook events. He told his story of being invited to an event that was thousands of miles away and irrelevant to him. In this case it was a “hands-on” singles mixer. Scott is a happily-married guy and wondered how he merited an invitation to a “hands-on” singles mixer. I don’t even want to think of what “hands-on” means lol!

Scott’s post resonated with me because I get lots of Facebook invitations to events that are halfway across the country. His point was that these invitations could kill Facebook. Hopefully Facebook has on their radar fixing the functionality of events.

Scott shared an anecdote, pulled out the meaning of that anecdote for all of us and for Facebook. What’s your story? Start with a simple anecdote. If you need help telling your story, contact John at js@clientkudos.com. Tell him that Leilani sent you.

Marketing on Facebook 101: Posting Status Updates People Want to Read

I’ve made my living writing stuff that hopefully people want to read. If they don’t read it, then I can’t pay my mortgage and my kids don’t eat. Let’s say I have an urgency to write status updates that people want to read. 😀

I have over 1,300 friends on Facebook and set my news feed so I can read updates from all of my friends, not just the ones I interact with. I found out today that Noa is in a relationship, Lisa is looking for an apartment, and Molly drove to Texas and went deep-sea fishing. I read these updates because I care about Lisa, Molly and Noa who announced his relationship.

Scott Stratten author of “Unmarketing” said it perfectly when he wrote, “A business doesn’t care about your product or service until you care about them.” So many status updates read like a newsfeed of product announcements, special offers, discounts etc. with no comments. Lisa, Molly and Noa got a response from me because I care about them.

By its very nature, Facebook is a social site. To that end, a business must care about their targeted fans. How do we show that we care? We post updates that they are interested in, not just product announcements and special offers. One study that I read stated that 80% of your updates should be about stuff your audience cares about and 20% pitching your wares.

And interestingly enough, the updates that get shared the most are images, followed by videos then text. The goal of your status updates is to engage your customers and prospects, not just sell. If your fans are into country music, why not post a video of a country music artist that they like? Or if your company supports Make-A-Wish, and your fans connect with that cause, then share updates from the Make-A-Wish page.

I try to mix it up as far as status updates — videos, interesting images and text. My goal is to build a community within the business page so fans look forward to the updates. One of my clients is a CARSTAR. During the winter season, I posted tips on driving on ice. The owner said that a driver came to the store and told him how much she appreciated reading the advice about driving in winter weather.

The key is to create a relationship between your business with your customers or prospects. Get your customer to talk to you and you’re establishing brand loyalty. Get them to share your updates and you’ve extended your reach! Next time – 10 Ideas for Status Updates.


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